Links     "The wireless telegraph is not difficult to understand. The ordinary telegraph is like a very long cat. You pull the tail in New York, and it meows in Los Angeles. The wireless is the same, only without the cat." Albert Einstein

Conferences

Bibliographies

Data

Education

Individuals

Information

Journals

Organizations

Social Sciences

Software


Informational Sites

  • BibEc database: an index of working papers both on and off the web. A truly excellent resource.
  • Econlit: available by subscription only, but has extensive citations of published work.
  • ResearchIndex: like the social science citation index, but freer and better.
  • Social Science Citation Index
  • Christian Zimmermann's Real Business Cycle Pages: an excellent guide to web resources on stochastic general equilibrium theory and related modern macroeconomics.
  • Bob Parks' Economics Working Paper Archive: an extensive collection of working papers in all subjects in economics, and many links to other research sites.
  • John Iron's Economics Guide: an annotated guide to economics resources on the web, plus some general interest material for non-economists.
  • Christian Zimmermann's list of economics institutions with a web presence.
  • John Irons list of economists with home pages on the web.
  • EconomicsSearch.Com is an informational site for economics students, and has a good, well organized collection of resources,   including on-line textbooks and courses.
  • RationalExpections.com another informational site, just getting started.
  • The Grand Coalition Web Site by Rod Garratt and Guillaume Haeringer is devoted to the cooperative and noncooperative study of coalition formation. Although just getting started, it already has lots of good material.

Educational Sites

  • Didactic Web-Based Experiments in GAME THEORY by Ariel Rubinstein and Eli Zvuluny is a resource instructors can use to develop on-line instruction.
  • Aplia is a commercial enterprise headed by Paul Romer to provide resources for instructors to develop on-line instruction.

Individual Sites

Bibliographies

Journals

Online

  • Theoretical Economics: The new open access journal in Economic Theory. It is a traditional refereed journal intended to become the premier specialty journal in economic theory. The journal does not take your copyright as do commercial journals. It makes the paper freely downloadable, and to guarantee the widest distribution and exposure for your paper, you release it under a Creative Commons License, making it freely redistributable by everyone.
  • BE Press: Several commercial online journals. The licensing agreement: you give them exclusive electronic rights to the paper [apparently only for a year], and may reproduce the paper electronically only on your own or institutional non-commercial website. This is just as well, because they also plan to charge people to view your paper.
  • BibEc database: This is not actually a journal: it is an index of working papers both on and off the web. It is much more useful than a journal.
  • Economic Bulletin: A new non-commercial effort to preempt the hardcopy journals. The licensing agreement: you grant them only the right to do what they want with the paper; you can also do whatever you want with it, provided you acknowledge prior publication in the Bulletin.
  • JSTOR: images of back issues [if your library subscribes] for major economics journals. The only remaining commercial publisher, Elsevier does not allow their back issues to be made available through JSTOR, preferring to provide the service themselves. Unfortunately they do an awful job of it.

Publishers

  • Elsevier has home pages for its journals. Unfortunately, a subscription is required to the abstracts; only the titles of articles are available to non-subscribers. A very badly designed site. They now own Academic Press as well. Here is my old review of the Academic Press site: Academic Press: full text of articles [if your library subscribes] plus abstracts [even if it does not] for their journals. Inadequate capacity for the site means you can only browse weekends and evenings unless your library has a subscription. In addition to failing to provide back issues, there is something wrong with their server: on my system at least, their pdf files appear to be blank. I think it is fair to say that I have no confidence in the ability of commercial publishers to use the net.
  • MIT Press: contents and abstracts, as well as instructions for authors. Fortunately, the QJE at least is available also through JSTOR.
  • SSRN: Marty Feldstein tries his hand at a for-profit website. NBER working papers for a fee.

Journals [pretty out of date - look 'em up on google]

Organizations

This is a pretty feeble list of organizations. For a really good list go to Christian Zimmerman's site.

Data

Software

  • Word2tex this is an amazing program because it can convert word documents, including mathtype equations to tex; and decent tex at that. One warning: you must have MS Word to run the program: it enables you to save from word into the tex format. There is also an equally amazing program to convert tex2word.
  • If you use Linux you should be aware of vmware which provides pretty complete backwards compatibility with all versions of windows by running a virtual machine inside an XWindow. You must have a copy of windows you can install in this virtual machine. You should be aware that kernel updates often break vmware, although usually only in small ways. You should also take a look at crossover office. This is a custom version of wine which provides API compability with windows. Unlike vmware, this does not require windows; on the other hand it does not work as well. The current version of wine is good enough to run all of microsoft office, quicken, and most importantly mathtype (5, not earlier versions). It also runs word2tex (but I have not been able to get tex2word to work).
  • Numerical Recipes including the full text of the book. For those that don't know, numerical recipes provides source code and commentary for many important numerical methods. The zero-sum game solver on this cite is based on a numerical recipes linear programming routine.
  • Mathtype, a really good version of the equation editor that comes with MS Word.
  • Scientific Workplace, It does do TeX more or less on-screen, and has the Maple engine built in. Too bad they feel the need to embed a great equation editor in a lousy word processor. If you have Linux, take a look at lyx, an open source program similar to scientific workplace. It doesn't do the maple stuff, but on the other hand, it works a whole lot better.
  • PDA Public Domain Algorithms

Social Sciences


If you are worried about the google monopoly, try teoma, which is also pretty good. They claim to provide their own search results (most people just license google). However, they do get their ads from google, so maybe they get their search results from them too...